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Dirty deeds: How forensics breakthrough may help capture killer of AC/DC manager

A forensic breakthrough could provide long sought-after answers to the unsolved murder of former AC/DC manager Crispin Dye.

Aug 22, 2023, updated Aug 22, 2023
Supplied undated image obtained Wednesday, Aug. 13, 2014 of musician and rock manager Crispin Dye aka Cris Kemp aka Chris Kemp. Police hope a $100,000 reward will lead to the killer of a former AC/DC manager who died after being assaulted and robbed in Sydney more than 20 years ago.  (AAP Image/NSW Police) NO ARCHIVING, EDITORIAL USE ONLY

Supplied undated image obtained Wednesday, Aug. 13, 2014 of musician and rock manager Crispin Dye aka Cris Kemp aka Chris Kemp. Police hope a $100,000 reward will lead to the killer of a former AC/DC manager who died after being assaulted and robbed in Sydney more than 20 years ago. (AAP Image/NSW Police) NO ARCHIVING, EDITORIAL USE ONLY

An inquiry resumes on Tuesday into the bashing death of the long-term manager of the legendary Australian rock band in Sydney’s inner-city suburb of Darlinghurst nearly 30 years ago.

Mr Dye died on Christmas Day 1993, a day after being attacked near Oxford St where he had been celebrating the release of his debut solo album.

An inquest in 1995 failed to shed light on the case and a $100,000 reward also led nowhere.

A hearing earlier this year was told Mr Dye’s blood-stained jeans and denim shirt were never sent for forensic analysis and other exhibits were lost.

Potentially crucial information written on two pieces of paper found in the 41-year-old’s shirt pocket had sat in an evidence box for almost 30 years.

At the direction of the inquiry, five items of Mr Dye’s clothing – including his jeans and shirt – were submitted for analysis.

Blood found on the back pocket of Mr Dye’s jeans was found to contain DNA from an unknown male, matching a profile obtained from another crime scene.

The sensational development will be discussed during Tuesday’s hearing that is part of the Special Commission of Inquiry into LGBTIQ hate crime.

Forensic and DNA analysis experts are expected to provide comment on the latest findings.

The wide-ranging probe has been examining the deaths of gay people between 1970 and 2010.

The commissioner, Supreme Court Justice John Sackar, is due to deliver a final report to the government in December.

Lifeline 13 11 14

Fullstop Australia 1800 385 578

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